How do I prepare for an A&R meeting?

It's hard to get noticed when everyone is clamoring to get noticed. There are a lot of artists in the industry and they're all competing for the attention of A&Rs and music executives. In this article, we'll go over how to prepare for an A&R meeting so that you stand out amongst the crowd.


A&R stands for "artists and repertoire." In this case, "repertoire" means your music, the songs you write. A&R is the department at a record label that finds new talent, signs them to the label, and works with them to polish their artistry and release music.


A&R stands for "artists and repertoire." In this case, "repertoire" means your music, the songs you write. A&R is the department at a record label that finds new talent, signs them to the label, and works with them to polish their artistry and release music.

When you meet with an A&R person, they want to hear your best songs the ones that demonstrate what makes you special as an artist. If you're just starting out in your career as a songwriter or musician (or if someone else is pitching on behalf of your band), it's important to prepare yourself for this meeting ahead of time so that no matter what happens during those first few minutes together (and there will be some inevitable awkward silence), it'll go smoothly enough that everyone leaves thinking good things about each other and looking forward to working together again soon!


Getting a meeting with A&R execs at a record label or management company requires both luck and following specific guidelines.

A&R executives are busy people. They have a lot on their plate and aren’t going to waste their time with anyone who doesn’t follow the guidelines for booking a meeting. But if you do manage to get that meeting, then it's important that you know what to expect from an A&R exec and how best to prepare for it.

A good way to think about this is like going on a date. You don't just show up empty-handed and hope for the best you prep! So before booking any meetings, take some time and make sure your music has been mastered by someone who knows what they're doing. Then make sure all of your social media accounts are up-to-date and active; including links where they can find more of your work online. And finally, have some great photos taken by professionals at least three months in advance so they will be ready when they need them.


To prepare for the meeting, you should have clear ideas about where you want to go next in your career. How would a record deal help?

To make the most of your A&R meeting, you should be prepared to discuss how a record deal would help you. You should know exactly what you want from the recording process and how it will benefit your career. For example, if you're an up-and-coming new artist, perhaps having more creative control over your work will allow for a greater chance at success than releasing an album through an independent label or self-publishing on SoundCloud. Or perhaps staying away from major labels is important because they may hinder your ability to pursue other interests (like touring). If either of these scenarios sounds familiar to you, it might be time for some serious soul-searching about where and how being signed would fit into your future plans.


If becoming famous isn't necessarily one of them (and let's face it: not everyone wants that), then consider where else this could lead in terms of exposure and publicity many artists who don't aim for chart-topping hits still find success through touring or licensing their music; these things don't require any kind of contract with a major record label!

Once again: before meeting with anyone in person about anything related to the music business or entertainment industry careers in general--even if they say they are just interested in helping out to make sure everything feels right!


Things like social media metrics (number of followers across various platforms), press mentions, and numbers of streams on various services such as SoundCloud or Spotify are likely to come up.

It's also likely that you'll be asked about how many followers you have across various social media platforms, and how well your music has been received in the press. The more coverage you can demonstrate, the better. Things like social media metrics (number of followers across various platforms), press mentions, and numbers of streams on various services such as SoundCloud or Spotify are likely to come up.


The best thing you can do to prepare for an A&R meeting is work on your artistry your live performance and recorded music and make yourself a unique presence on social media.

The best thing you can do to prepare for an A&R meeting is work on your artistry your live performance and recorded music and make yourself a unique presence on social media. You should have a clear idea of where you want to go next in your career and what that would look like.

Social media metrics (number of followers across various platforms), press mentions, and number of streams on various services are important factors that A&Rs consider when deciding whether or not to sign an artist.


You can only control how much you are prepared for the meeting; everything else, like the person's feelings about your music or whether it has potential in the market, is entirely out of your control.

You can only control how much you are prepared for the meeting; everything else, like the person's feelings about your music or whether it has potential in the market, is entirely out of your control. This is why it's so important to be ready for an A&R meeting—your preparation will show that you're serious about getting signed and will give you something else to discuss with the label representative besides just what they think of your songs.


Conclusion

A&R people are looking for artists who have something unique about them. If you've got that, great! But if not, you can always work on polishing your live performance and honing your sound. The most important thing is to be prepared for the meeting you should have clear ideas about where you want to go next in your career and how a record deal would help get there

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